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longboarddocumentary:

Friends don’t let friends scratch their helmets

longboarddocumentary:

Friends don’t let friends scratch their helmets

bombing:

cop: who the hell ordered all these pizzas

me: you said i got one phone call

All this weed and no one to smoke it with..

senor-sam:

bromosexua1:

besturlonhere:

this is incredible

I don’t get it

The Schutzstaffel

senor-sam:

bromosexua1:

besturlonhere:

this is incredible

I don’t get it

The Schutzstaffel

too highhh

bearingsandtrucks:

You cant avoid a comet rape sloth

bearingsandtrucks:

You cant avoid a comet rape sloth

I just watched this

I just watched this

vivalongboard:

Little more Aruban desert action with an early grab

vivalongboard:

Little more Aruban desert action with an early grab

typette:

misterbunni:

sagansense:

Welcome to the United States of America.

What the actual fuck.

dude if you make bill nye scowl, you need to re-evaluate your relevance to this planet

typette:

misterbunni:

sagansense:

Welcome to the United States of America.

What the actual fuck.

dude if you make bill nye scowl, you need to re-evaluate your relevance to this planet

shmemson:

Me all summer

shmemson:

Me all summer

hassavocado:

taiyo matsumoto

hassavocado:

taiyo matsumoto

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”